Lunch Poems

September 25, 2008

Here’s a productivity tip that I found on 43 folders:  lunch-poems.

The story is that Frank worked at ArtNews in New York, and during his lunch time, he would walk into the Olivetti typewriter show room and type out a poem from his mind at that moment.  It is one of the reason that I own an Olivetti.  It had the immediacy which makes me think of blogs and emails.  I think that Frank would have been a great emailler, blogger, micro blogger texting in his updates through a Blackberry.  Sadly, he died at 40.  His death was even mythic.  I remember my friend from High School telling me about the Dune Buggy accident on Fire Island.  I learn about the New York art Scene and artists through Frank’s writings. 

Franks poems are genre crossing (to use a buzz word). They are also diaries, letters, dedications and notes to friends.  He made poetry accessible.  He had a philosphy about life and writing call Personism, A Manifesto.  Personism, I recall from a long ago reading of it is this:  Frank said that if some one is chasing you down the street, you don’t stop and pull out your diploma from Harvard and say I’m better then you, no you run and use your cunning to win over an opponent, you prove yourself at that moment instead of being defended by your past title etc.  This was inspiring.  His basic aesthetic meter was also less intellectual.  He had a metaphor of a pair of jean, is it sexy and tight and will it get you into bed?  I never heard of anyone spoke about poetry in that way.  He made it more appealing without letting the technical aspects of a poem get in the way of the enjoyment.  You can read about it here: poetspath.com/transmissions/messages/ohara.html

Frank with a typewriter

Gus Powell picked up on this idea of Lunch Poem in photography.  

Jen Bekman’s Blog call Personism.

20×200 jeffrey-krolick

One Response to “Lunch Poems”


  1. What an interesting post Duc. The story about wit and cunning vs. a paper degree really resonates with me. It’s interesting to see how many Ivy League grads “fail” in real life, while high school dropouts become inventors and business people that help shape the world.

    I love writers and poets who are not pretentious — and in their humility and raw honesty become the greatest communicators of all🙂


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